Lunar

Moon Over Easter

The March Equinox has come and gone, which means Easter is on its way. Easter is a Moveable Feast that takes place on the first Sunday after the first Full Moon on or after the March Equinox. I’m using the term March Equinox because its seasonal attribute depends on the hemisphere you are in. In the southern hemisphere it’s the Autumnal Equinox. In the northern hemisphere it’s the Vernal (Spring) Equinox. As Easter is based on northern hemisphere seasons, it is a Spring Festival. Which explains the rabbit and the eggs.

What isn’t really explained is why there are often two Easters – one for Western Christians and one for Eastern Orthodox Christians. The answer is simple (well actually it’s not even slightly simple!). While the above formula is used by both, Western churches use the Gregorian calendar and Eastern churches use the Julian calendar. Plus, there are differences in how the Equinox and the Full Moon are defined. Eastern churches use the Astronomical Equinox and Full Moon, while the Western churches use a set date (March 21) for the Equinox and an Ecclesiastical Moon, which comes from a church calendar.

To make it a bit more confusing, Eastern Easter is always after Passover, because Jesus celebrated Passover before he was executed. Western Easter doesn’t worry about that in what appears to be a search for simplicity. So what does that all mean? Well this year Western Easter will be celebrated on Sunday March 27th and Eastern Orthodox on Sunday May 1st.

The one question that never gets answered for me is – “Does the Easter Bunny visit on both Easters?” 🙂 Just in case the answer is “yes”, here is a recipe for Carrot Cupcakes with Cream Cheese Frosting topped with Candied Carrots.

Easter Bunny Cupcakes

easter bunny

Ingredients
for the carrot cupcakes
1 + 1/3 cup plain flour
1 + 1/2 teaspoons baking soda
1 + 1/4  teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
3 eggs, room temperature
1 cup sugar
3/4 cup vegetable oil
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 cups peeled and grated carrot

for the candied carrots
3/4 cup sugar
3/4 cup water
1 cup peeled and grated carrot

for the cream cheese frosting
1 cup (225g) cream cheese, softened
1/2 cup (115g) unsalted butter, softened
2 teaspoons vanilla extract
4 cups powdered (icing) sugar, sifted

optional
mini chocolate Easter eggs for decoration

Instructions
Preheat the oven to 180C / 350F.
Line a 12-hole muffin pan with 12 paper cases.
Sift together the flour, baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt in a bowl and set aside.
In a separate bowl, beat the eggs and sugar together with an electric mixer until light and frothy.
Using a wooden spoon or spatula, stir in the oil, vanilla and carrot.
Fold in the flour mix until just combined.
Using an ice-cream scoop, spoon the batter evenly into the paper cases.
Bake for 10 – 20 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the centre of a cupcake comes out clean. Allow to cool for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

While cupcakes are cooling, make the candied carrots by placing the sugar and water into a saucepan. Bring to the boil over high heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Add the carrots and cook for 5 minutes stirring occasionally. Remove carrots from the syrup and place in a heatproof bowl. Cook syrup for a further 10 minutes or until reduced. Pour syrup over carrots and allow to cool. Preheat oven to 110C / 230F. Line a baking tray with baking paper. Drain the carrots and spread in a thin layer on prepared tray. Bake for 45 – 60 minutes or until they start to harden. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely. They will harden more when cooling.

While carrots are cooling make the cream cheese frosting by creaming together the cream cheese, butter and vanilla extract in a medium sized bowl with an electric mixer. Gradually beat in the powdered sugar until frosting reaches a piping consistency. Spoon icing into a piping bag and pipe onto cupcakes.

Sprinkle a small amount of the candied carrot onto each cupcake.
Decorate with mini chocolate easter eggs if desired.

Full Moons & Full Drinks

Moon

Dracula Tarot Moon Card
Created by Vicky Vladic
Illustrated by Anna Gerraty

December’s full moon falls on xmas day, which is a very rare event. The last one was in 1977 and the next one will be in 2034. In honour of the full moon and the shining bright star that is a part of the xmas story, I created a very special drink – a glow in the dark gin and tonic. The inclusion of apple is tasty, but the star hidden inside makes it a perfect solstice and xmas addition 🙂

Quinine, found in tonic water, glows under UV light so, if you have a blacklight you can shine it on this drink for a glowing surprise.

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Gin & Tonic By Day

 

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Gin & Tonic By Blacklight

Glow In The Dark Gin And Tonic
For each glass you will need:
100ml frozen tonic water
100ml frozen apple juice
50ml gin
apple slice cut crosswise to show the star shape

Method
Freeze the tonic water in large cubes.
Freeze the apple juice in large cubes.
Place the ice cubes into a large glass.
Pour in the gin.
Add the apple slice and wait for the cubes to melt.

A Very Magical Weekend

I knew it was Imbolc weekend but I forgot it was also a Blue Moon.
To find out more about Imbolc and see my recipe for Grenadine Mulled Wine click here. To find out more about Blue Moons, read on 🙂

There are actually three different types of Blue Moons which I call Calendar Blue Moons,
Astrological Blue Moons and Seasonal Blue Moons.

A Calendar Blue Moon is when a second Full Moon occurs in the same calendar month. While this is now the commonly accepted interpretation, it is actually the newest way to calculate a Blue Moon and is the least celebrated in the esoteric realms.

An Astrological Blue Moon is when a second Full Moon happens in the same Astrological Sign. Much like a calendar month, Astrological months are approximately four weeks in length. Astrological months begin and end around the 20th of each month. If an Astrological sign begins and ends with a Full Moon, the second Full Moon is a Blue Moon. This was the type of Blue Moon I was taught about in both my vampiric and witchy education and is the one I celebrate.

A Seasonal Blue Moon is when there is a fourth Full Moon in a seasonal cycle. I had never heard of this interpretation before and only discovered it whilst doing research for this blog. It is a bit more complex to work out. Basically there are four seasonal cycles in a year measured from Solstice to Equinox. Each cycle lasts three months and has three Full Moons. Occasionally there is a fourth Full Moon, but, surprisingly, it is the third Full Moon and not the fourth that is a Blue Moon!

The reason for this appears to be that the twelve Full Moons of the seasonal cycles have names and seasonal attributes such as the first Full Moon after the Solstice, the first Full Moon of the season and the first Full Moon before the Equinox. When a fourth Full Moon occurs in this cycle it throws off the order. I’m still not sure why it is the third and not the fourth Full Moon that is Blue. I’ll have to research that further.

To celebrate the Blue Moon I thought I would create a fun version of the retro cheese ball –
after all, isn’t the Moon made of cheese 🙂 There are no quantities, only ratios, so feel free to change it up how you like. Just make sure you use blue cheese and blue corn chips!

Blue Moon Cheese Ball

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Ingredients
2 parts cream cheese
1 part blue cheese
crushed blue maize corn chips

Instructions
Bring the cheeses to room temperature.
Mash together then form into balls. You can do one big ball or multiple bite sized balls. There are no set rules.
Roll in crushed corn chips.
Cover and refrigerate until set.
Serve with shots of blue agave Tequila.

The Autumn Queen

I have often wondered about the concept of the Triple Goddess and her relationship to women’s cycles. Traditionally, the Triple Goddess is envisioned as the Maiden, Mother and Crone. These three phases are supposed to correspond to the three phases of a woman’s life which are symbolically linked to three blood mysteries; menarche/menstruation, childbirth and menopause. As a number of my female friends are about to celebrate their 50th birthdays and are also experiencing the beginnings of menopause, I began to wonder whether they were indeed entering the time of the Crone or some intermediary stage. When I interact with women who are much older – say in their late 70’s and beyond – there is a depth of wisdom and solitude that I do not find in my younger friends. It appears to me that women in their late 40’s and early 50’s are being prematurely hastened into the role of the Crone way before their time.

As a woman in the middle of the “Mother” phase I always felt as though there was another phase of my life to explore before becoming the Crone. In some ways, by focussing solely on female biology, the Triple Goddess, as a metaphor for female transitions, can be limiting. Interestingly, the Triple Goddess is not only linked to the number three but also to the number four. The Triple Goddess is connected to the phases of the Moon and the Seasons which all have four aspects. The Waxing New Moon is the Maiden and associated with Spring, the Full Moon is the Mother and linked to Summer and the Dark Moon is the Crone and corresponds to Winter. However, one Season and one Moon phase are missing from this scenario; Autumn and the Waning Moon. This omission made me consider that one phase of a woman’s journey may also be missing.

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Synchronistically, it was at this time that I discovered a book called “The Women’s Wheel of Life: Thirteen Archetypes of Woman at Her Fullest Power” by Elizabeth Davis & Carol Leonard. They too discovered that one phase of a woman’s life journey may be repressed by focussing on a three-phase cycle. Significantly, this revelation came to Carol Leonard whilst painting a mural depicting the four Seasons represented by four dancing Goddesses. Although Spring, Summer and Winter Goddesses were easily visualised as Maiden, Mother and Crone, Carol found it difficult to envision an Autumn Goddess. What she eventually created was “an image of a queenly woman, draped in rich robes of deep red and gold, holding a base of harvest goods”. She named this aspect of the Seasonal Goddess the Matriarch. When Davis and Leonard offered the image of Woman as Matriarch to a workshop “all the women in their middle years unanimously said, “Yes!” and breathed a collective sigh of relief”. Is it time to expand our notion of a Triple Goddess and unveil a fourth face? I would say “Yes!”

A Four-Fold Goddess corresponds to other Spiritual Traditions that utilise four-fold concepts. Many religions invoke the four directions – South, East, North and West – or the four elements – Earth, Air, Fire and Water. Some forms of Witchcraft follow a Seasonal calendar that includes four Major Sabbats – Samhain, Imbolc, Beltane and Lammas – and four Minor Sabbats – Autumn Equinox, Winter Solstice, Spring Equinox and Summer Solstice. Other Witches follow a Lunar cycle celebrating the four phases of the Moon – First Quarter, Full Moon, Last Quarter and Dark Moon. Astrology utilises the four elements and Tarot also has four suits – Pentacles, Swords, Wands and Cups which also relate to the four elements. The Four-Fold Goddess can be linked to any and all of these systems.

The hidden fourth face of the Goddess is also a particularly powerful aspect of a woman’s life journey. Rather than go straight from the Summer Full Moon phase – a time dedicated to nurturing others, to the Winter Dark Moon Crone phase – a time of impending withdrawal from the world, the Autumn Waning Moon Queen allows us an intermediary time where we can not only reflect on our lives but also have some say in world affairs. The Autumn Queen phase allows us the time to enjoy our own personal power in the world. As women we have probably spent most of our time nurturing others but now the time has come to nurture ourselves. The biggest challenge for women is coming into contact with our own power. Perhaps by harnessing the power of our Autumn Queen our task may be simpler.

By focussing on a three-fold rite of passage intimately connected to our biology, we may miss one of our more powerful passages – our initiation into Autumn Queens.

I am looking forward to moving into the role of Autumn Queen, for although I love the idea of being a Crone, I do believe it is a role related to a much later stage in our lives.

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I wrote this article 15 years ago at the ripe old age of 35. So if you’re good at maths you’ll see that I’ve reached my Autumn Queen stage – I’ve turned 50! Do I still believe the words I wrote all those years ago? Do I still feel we need an Autumn Queen archetype? Yes I do!

The lead up to my 50th birthday was not what I had planned. I had envisioned massages, facials, manicures and much needed pedicures. Instead my birthday was shadowed by the illness and death of one of my beloved dogs. The Crone had come to take something away from me and I wasn’t ready. When I looked into her face through my tears I knew one thing – I was no Crone. I wasn’t ready to quietly slip into a time of self-reflection, acceptance and withdrawal. I was leaving the Mother stage behind with the death of one my children and I was fighting all the way – for him and for myself. There was no way I could transition from a Mother to a Crone without an intermediary phase. For me that phase is the Autumn Queen. As befits an Elder Goth, I took on the Autumn mantle of the Queen shrouded in death and darkness. I embraced becoming an Autumn Queen with great sadness but also with great wonder. Against the odds I had a wild 50th birthday. It was in fact the best birthday I have ever had. For one weekend I put aside all my worries about others, all my pain and all my fears for what the future held. For one weekend I really lived in the moment. I concentrated on having a fabulous time and made sure I was a pampered and well looked after Autumn Queen. It felt wonderful. And it’s only the beginning of my journey.

Friday On My Mind / Bad Moon On The Rise

This Friday is Friday the 13th. It’s a very special Friday the 13th because it falls on a Full Moon. On a mythic, spiritual and magical level, this Friday the 13th links us to three powerful archetypes:

  • The meaning of Friday
  • The number 13
  • The power of the Moon

The Romans called Friday dies veneris in honour of Venus, the Goddess of Love. The Norse then named Friday after their Goddess of Love, Frigg. So why would a day named after Goddesses of Love be considered unlucky? There is no real answer except that Friday has been considered an unlucky day by many cultures and for quite a long time. More recently, Friday has become associated with bad luck because it is the day Jesus was crucified.

The fear of the number 13 has been around since at least the time of the ancient Babylonians. Again, why is this so? 12 is seen as a number of completion whereas 13 has been seen as the number that comes along and disrupts or corrupts this. The Norse myth of Balder, a version of the Sleeping Beauty fairytale and the Last Supper are stories that feature a dinner with 13 guests – invited or uninvited, and the dire consequences of these events. 13 at a dinner is still considered unlucky. 13 was thought to be the traditional number of witches in a coven; a perversion of Jesus and his 12 disciples. There are also 13 full moons in a year which challenges the 12 months of the year system.

Of course you could look at 13 as the beginning of a new cycle like the Egyptians did. 13 was a lucky number in ancient Egypt as they believed there were 12 stages of life and the 13th stage was death and transformation in the afterlife. This wasn’t anything to be feared but was part of a natural cycle to be celebrated. Interestingly the tarot Death card is the number 13.

So what do you get when you put the fear of Friday together with the fear of the number 13? Friggatriskaidekaphobia, a word that combines the name of Friday’s Goddess Frigg with triskaidekaphobia, the fear of the number 13. Add a full moon and this fearful day grows to mythic proportions.

The light of the silvery moon has been celebrated as a romantic emblem; a time for love to blossom and lovers to meet. A full moon on a day named after a love Goddess and on a number that symbolises rebirth and new cycles should be a romantic time. But that bright, shining orb changes monthly and goes from bright and beautiful to dark and hidden. Consequently this mysterious entity is also associated with fear, madness and lunacy. A full moon is believed to bring out the worst in everyone. And, as horror movies have shown, brings out the worst monsters – particularly werewolves and vampires.

If we put this all together we can see that Friday was named after a Roman Goddess of Love and is now named after a Norse Goddess of Love and that the number 13 is associated with the moon, women and the cycle of life, death and rebirth. So perhaps the fear being exploited on Friday the 13th is a fear of ancient pagan religions which celebrate, love, life, death, the moon and women. Rather than fear this day, maybe we should reflect upon its deeper meanings.

So go out and celebrate this Full Moon Friday the 13th. There won’t be another until August, 2049.

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let the madness begin