Halloween on Easter

One of the quirks of celebrating Halloween on April 30th in the southern hemisphere is that it sometimes coincides with Eastern Orthodox Easter. Due to the differences between the way Orthodox and Western churches calculate Easter, they are often on different days. Halloween and Western Easter cannot fall on the same day, but that’s not so for Orthodox Easter. You can read about the complicated reasons for the differences in Easter dates in my previous post Moon Over Easter.

This year Orthodox Good Friday falls on Southern Hemisphere Halloween, which got me thinking about the similarities between those two special days. Naturally I thought about Halloween’s focus on ghosts and spirits and Easter’s focus on the death and resurrection of Jesus. How much more Halloween can you get than a story of a man dying and then returning from the dead? It doesn’t even matter if he returns as a man, zombie or ghost – it all fits with the spirit of Halloween!

Another Halloween/Easter theme is blood. Gory and scary looking food is a feature of Halloween celebrations, while the Easter tradition of colouring eggs red is meant to represent the blood of Christ that is shed on Good Friday. The hard eggshell represents the tomb Jesus is sealed in, and when you crack the eggshell, it symbolises Jesus’ release from the tomb and his resurrection from the dead. This connection of the egg with blood, death and rebirth, makes eggs perfect symbols for Halloween too.

A tasty egg dish that is traditionally served for both Easter and Halloween is Devilled Eggs. I’ve already shared a recipe for Devilled Eggs in my Dracula’s Journey post. I’ve added a Halloween tweak to the recipe, which now features pumpkin puree and pumpkin spice. I also decorated the eggs with pumpkin seed flour, pumpkin seed oil and pumpkin seeds to really pump up the pumpkin flavours. You can also drizzle with pomegranate molasses or another red sauce to give them a ghoulish look. 🙂 The great thing about Halloween food is that you can go all out with the decorating!

Pumpkin Devilled Eggs

Ingredients
6 boiled eggs
2/3 cups pumpkin puree
1 tablespoon sour cream
sea salt to taste
pumpkin spice to taste*

for decorating
pumpkin seed oil
pumpkin seed flour
pumpkin seeds

Instructions
Cut eggs in half lengthways and scoop out the yolk into a bowl.
Mash the egg yolk then add the sour cream and pumpkin puree. Mix until combined.
Add salt and pumpkin spice to taste.
Spoon or pipe mixture back into the eggs.
Decorate your eggs your way!

*you can use store-bought pumpkin spice mix or make your own. This is my version:
1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon ground ginger
1/8 teaspoon ground cloves
1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg 
Mix the spices together in a small bowl.

Happy Halloween!

3 comments

  1. Spot on about the similarities between Easter and Halloween. (Here in the Northern Hemisphere people are not confronted with it, of course, but it makes sense.) Very interesting ideas. Some people have pointed out the similarities between Jesus and vampires — both rose from the dead, and the blood drinking. In the Catholic Church, which I was raised in, Jesus literally encourages the drinking of blood. (Which is one reason why Catholics were so hated, haha!)

    I love your ideas about the deviled eggs! I have never even considered pumpkin for them. You are so creative! 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Heathen blood drinking (and flesh eating) Catholics! It’s one of the things I love most about Catholics. 🙂 The eastern Orthodox church also believes in transubstantiation but it’s the Catholics that seem to get all the hate.

      Vampires and Jesus are intimately linked in so many ways. There’s a lot of stuff written about it but I haven’t delved into it – yet!

      I love pumpkin so much I try to squash it in everything. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think the Catholics got al the hate because of Rome and the Pope (but also the Catholic church had a lot of corruption,)

        Happy Pumpkin eating! I am still making pumpkin coffees even though it is spring here 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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